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Category: Equine

 

Clinical and intestinal histologic features of horses treated for recurrent colic: 66 cases (2006–2015)

H.L. Stewart, J.B. Engiles, D. Stefanovski and L. Southwood | Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association | May 2018
For many horses with recurrent colic, the cause for recurrence is unknown…

Use of a saliva-based diagnostic test to identify tapeworm infection in horses in the UK

K.L. Lightbody, J.B. Matthews, J.G. Kemp-Symonds, P.A. Lambert and C.J. Austin | Equine Veterinary Journal | March 2018
Horses are exposed to a number of parasitic helminths whilst grazing, including tapeworms Anoplocephala perfoliata, Anoplocephala magna and Paranoplocephala mamilliana, and roundworms cyathostomins, large strongyles and Parascaris equorum

horses' feet

Computed tomographic contrast tenography of the digital flexor tendon sheath of the equine hindlimb

R. Agass, J. Dixon and B. Fraser | Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound | December 2017
Pre-surgical diagnostic investigation of the equine digital flexor tendon sheath is challenging with the current standard imaging techniques of ultrasonography and contrast radiography…

horse

Incidence and risk factors of surgical site infection and septic arthritis after elective arthroscopy in horses

J.Y. Brunsting, F.J. Pille, M. Oosterlinck., M. Haspeslagh and H.C. Wilderjans | Veterinary Surgery | October 2017
Elective arthroscopy is generally associated with a low risk of complications; the most common postoperative complications include infections either as a surgical site infection (SSI) and/or septic arthritis…

horse closeup

Nonstrangulating intestinal infarctions associated with Strongylus vulgaris: Clinical presentation and treatment outcomes of 30 horses (2008–2016)

T.H. Pihl, M.K. Nielsen, S.N. Olsen, P.S. Leifsson and S. Jacobsen | Equine Veterinary Journal | November 2017
The prevalence of Strongylus vulgaris in horses has increased in countries with a prescription-only anthelmintic policy. The migration of S. vulgaris larvae within the main branches of the cranial mesenteric artery is known to be associated with nonstrangulating intestinal infarction…

ponies in field

Evaluation of the use of midazolam as a co-induction agent with ketamine for anaesthesia in sedated ponies undergoing field castration

A. Allison, R. Robinson, C. Jolliffe and P.M. Taylor | Equine Veterinary Journal | September 2017
Ketamine is commonly used as an anaesthetic induction agent for equine anaesthesia, but it is a poor muscle relaxant so use of ketamine is frequently combined with a benzodiazepine. Diazepam and midazolam, both benzodiazepine derivatives, are often used to facilitate muscle relaxation in equine anaesthesia. Midazolam has the advantage of being water soluble therefore making it more compatible with other anaesthetic agents. Although the combination of ketamine and a benzodiazepine is generally accepted as giving higher quality of anaesthesia, there are few studies comparing the use of ketamine alone to a ketamine-benzodiazepine co-induction…