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Tag: lameness

BEVA primary care clinical guidelines: Analgesia

I.M. Bowen, A. Redpath, A. Dugdale, J.H. Burford, D. Lloyd, T. Watson and G.D. Hallowell | Equine Veterinary Journal | October 2019
The aim of these clinical guidelines is to provide recommendations on the use of analgesia in the horse in clinical practice. These guidelines are based on the most recent evidence combined with expert clinical opinion on the impact of analgesic choice on outcomes and adverse events…

Increase in the flock prevalence of lameness in ewes is associated with a reduction in farmers using evidence-based management of prompt treatment: A longitudinal observational study of 154 English sheep flocks 2013–2015

N.S. Prosser, K.J. Purdy and L.E. Green | Preventive Veterinary Medicine | December 2019
The aim of this longitudinal observational study was to investigate the prevalence of lameness and any changes in the management of lameness in sheep flocks monitored from 2013-2015…

Association of lameness and mastitis with return-to-service oestrus detection in the dairy cow

J. Remnant, M.J. Green, J. Huxley, J. Hirst-Beecham, R. Jones, G. Roberts and C.D. Hudson | Veterinary Record | October 2019
The aim of this observational study was to explore and quantify the impact of lameness and mastitis on return-to-service oestrus detection at individual cow level and to explore the impact of different ‘expected’ interval on any associations…

horses' feet

Computed tomographic contrast tenography of the digital flexor tendon sheath of the equine hindlimb

R. Agass, J. Dixon and B. Fraser | Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound | December 2017
Pre-surgical diagnostic investigation of the equine digital flexor tendon sheath is challenging with the current standard imaging techniques of ultrasonography and contrast radiography…

black and white holstein friesian cow grazing in grassland.

Risk of iatrogenic damage to the sciatic nerve in dairy cattle

R. M. Kirkwood, J.G. Remnant, R.M. Payne, A.M. Murphy and W. Wapenaar | Veterinary Record | November 2017
Damage to the sciatic nerve in cattle can lead to pain, lameness, and paralysis and therefore is a cause of concern for both welfare and productivity. Clinical texts indicate that sciatic nerve damage can be caused by intramuscular injections into the gluteal region with recommendations that gluteal or caudal thigh regions are not used for intramuscular injection in thin or young animals…